Here Are The 2023 Changes To Illinois’ Driving Laws That You Need To Know!

New Driving Laws You Should Know About in Illinois for 2023

There are a number of changes to traffic laws that drivers in Illinois will want to be aware of as a result of the more than 180 new laws that went into effect on January 1.

From stricter punishments for specific infractions to advice for those whose vehicles are stolen or hijacked, the law is changing.

One of the more significant changes, according to Chicago personal injury attorney Lance D. Northcutt, is a modification to the wording of several statutes that govern vehicular accidents. The accident will now be called a “crash” in the revised version.

Sobering up: “As a personal injury lawyer, I see far too many accidents that could have been prevented had the drivers not been drunk or distracted. Here at the company, we try to avoid using the word “accident” to describe incidents that could have been avoided had the driver been more cautious. Northcutt, an attorney at Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard, said in a statement, “It is encouraging to see lawmakers acknowledging that these incidents are preventable.”

Aside from the change in terminology, however, there are also a number of significant new regulations in place for motorists. New laws affecting drivers in the state will take effect on January 1, 2023.

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HB3772

A bill that makes it so “a person shall not be liable for violations, fees, fines, or penalties during the period in which the motor vehicle was reported to the appropriate law enforcement agency as stolen or hijacked” was approved by the Illinois legislature this spring as carjackings increased across the state.

HB3772

If the vehicle was reported stolen or hijacked, “the owner or the agents of the owner or lessee must submit proof that a report concerning the motor vehicle was filed with a law enforcement agency in a timely manner,” which includes impounding fees.

However, there’s a $1,000 cap on how much can be paid out for things like towing and storage.

SB03793

Stopping short of a school bus that is “receiving or discharging pupils and has displayed visual signals” or travelling at a speed of 20 mph or more in a school zone or while travelling on a roadway on public school property or where children pass to go to school will now carry an additional penalty of community service.

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HB04716

This bill would make the national Novice Teen Driver Education and Training Administrative Standards the basis for driver’s education curriculum and training requirements. This will replace the current framework, which calls for standards for students under 18 to be adopted by the State Board of Education in collaboration with the Secretary of State.

HB04716

The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation has mandated changes to the national teen driver education programme, “including classroom and behind-the-wheel hours and the cognitive, physiological, and psychological aspects of the safe operation of a motor vehicle and equipment of motor vehicles.

” According to the legislation, the guidelines were drafted by the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration in conjunction with the Association of National Stakeholders in Traffic Safety Education.

Northcutt hoped that the newly adopted national driver’s ed standards would result in safer driving practises among young drivers and a subsequent reduction in motor vehicle crashes in the years to come.

SB03216

In Illinois, a physical therapist with a valid licence will be able to attest to a driver’s disability beginning in 2023. In the past, only medical professionals, such as doctors, nurses, and PAs, were recognised by the state for making such a determination.

SB03216

A number of Illinois Public Acts pertaining to traffic collisions have also been amended to use the term “crash” instead of “accident.” The change in wording suggests that not all collisions are accidental and that many are brought about by carelessness, recklessness, or malice.

Sobering up: “As a personal injury lawyer, I see far too many accidents that could have been prevented had the drivers not been drunk or distracted. Here at the company, we try to avoid using the word “accident” to describe incidents that could have been avoided had the driver been more cautious.

Attorney for Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard Lance D. Northcutt applauded lawmakers for recognising that these tragedies could have been avoided. We anticipate fewer car accidents in the years to come as a result of the newly adopted national driver’s ed standards.

Final words

As of March 1st, 2021, drivers caught going 6-10 mph over the limit in areas monitored by speed cameras will be issued a citation. Anyone going 6–10 mph over the limit will be fined $30.00, while those going 11 mph or more will be hit with a $100.00 fine.

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  • Karan Sirari

    I am an author and a public speaker. I was born in India and have travelled to many different countries. I have a masters in public communication from California University and I love to write about famous peoples from different industries.

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